another list

Before sleeping the night before or while sipping that morning coffee, you’ve had it all planned out – your next day. One takes delight in every checked box. There’s that sense of achievement which lingers a few seconds then you drop your gaze to the rest of still unchecked tasks in your planner. At the end of the day, you let out that sigh of disappointment while counting the number of clear boxes beside the tasks you were supposed to do.

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Before sleeping the night before or while sipping that morning coffee, you’ve had it all planned out – your next day. One takes delight in every checked box. There’s that sense of achievement which lingers a few seconds then you drop your gaze to the rest of still unchecked tasks in your planner. At the end of the day, you let out that sigh of disappointment while counting the number of clear boxes beside the tasks you were supposed to do.

It gets worse when you find yourself writing the same task for more than a week already – even a month. You tell yourself your going to finish it today but somehow you find yourself writing the same entry for a different date. This makes one feel like a failure. It makes you doubt your ability to manage time efficiently. One wonders why there’s a lot of unfinished tasks when you really don’t remember wasting time doing nothing. One feels tired at the end of the day and yet there’s a lot left to do. How come?

Call me slow, but it was only this week that I somehow understood why. We spend the day doing more than what we indicated in that to-do list – way more than what we planned to. And we don’t really write these in the to-do. I guess there’s that need for a what I did list. Petty, I know,  but it would help one feel more productive.

We count the things we still need to do, not the things that we have done or accomplished. We evaluate how productive our day was based on what we accomplished from the to-do list  we laid out at the start of each day and not on what I did list.

It’s a simple list to confirm that you did not waste your time.

flipping pages

I love rainy days. I like them better if I could curl up in bed and finish at least one (previously owned) book. Back home, rain is frequent especially during the evenings. My old room had half a wall filled with pocketbooks and novels. I could be in Sicily at 9 pm, in Manhattan the next hour, and then back in old England with breeches and petticoats. Some of the older books had grown roots from the damp wall. I never knew were the roots came from.

I love rainy days. I like them better if I could curl up in bed and finish at least one  (previously owned) book. Back home, rain is frequent especially during the evenings. My old room had half a wall filled with pocketbooks and novels. I could be in Sicily at 9 pm, in Manhattan the next hour, and then back in old England with breeches and petticoats. Some of the older books had grown roots from the damp wall. I never knew were the roots came from.

Today, the time I spend on DVD marathons would have been time spent for reading. I’d hate to admit it but I’ve become a lazy reader. I don’t know how, but I’ve been spending more time staring at the screen waiting for a page to load than flipping pages of a book.

I feel accomplished every time I finish reading a book (even if it’s a Mills and Boons romance pocketbook). I haven’t felt that in a while. My last visit to a bookstore was more than a month ago. What have I been doing? Basically, telling myself I’m too busy to do anything, worrying about deadlines, feeling guilty – excuses.

Time to go back to flipping pages. Make time.